Preparation of the EU Adaptation Strategy (July 2012)

The scope of the consultation ranges from biodiversity and the degradation of ecosystem services to food production and water availability, from the short-term (before 2020) to the long-term (2050 and beyond), and from the regional/local level to the inter-regional and natioanl levels.

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Policy options for the Blueprint to Safeguard Europe’s Waters (June 2012)

The European Commission is in the process of updating it’s water policy with a Blueprint to safeguard Europe’s waters, to be published at the end of 2012.

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Financial support for energy efficiency in buildings (May 2012)

Dramatically improved energy efficiency in buildings is both achievable and economically desirable.

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Including maritime transport emissions in the EU’s greenhouse gas reduction commitment (April 2012)

In order to keep the global temperature change below two degrees, all aspects of our carbon emissions must be considered. Therefore it is essential that the maritime sector should contribute to European emission reduction efforts.

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More sustainable consumption and production (April 2012)

We call upon the Commission to revive a genuine sustainability strategy for the European Union, instead of trivialising its responsibilities in this very important regard.

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Areas of reinforcing the existing Euratom nuclear safety legislative framework (February 2012)

QCEA believes that the Euratom Treaty is the wrong platform to deal with nuclear safety of the EU Member States – it should be regulated by the EU Treaties. This is principally because the Euratom Treaty was established in order to promote the use of nuclear energy (Euratom art. 1), and any credible regulation of nuclear safety should be done under a legislative framework that is independent from promotion and operation of nuclear power.

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Water Efficiency in Buildings (January 2012)

Water efficiency needs to be seen as part of the EU’s wider resource efficiency efforts and integrated into that wider agena. For example, the energy sector accounts for some 45 per cent of water use.

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Reducing CO2 emissions from road vehicles (December 2011)

Cars are responsible for 14% of the EU’s total CO2 emissions, and they are the single largest source of transport emissions, representing around half of the total. Transport is also critical in the debate on Europe’s energy dependence, as it is responsible for about two-thirds of our oil use.

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The Smart Cities and Communities initiative (May 2011)

In its Energy 2020 strategy, the European Commission identified the Smart Cities and Communities Initiative as a project of European dimension for energy efficiency and for accelerating the large scale deployment of innovative, low-carbon technologies.

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The Europa 2020 Project Bond initiative (May 2011)

The Europe 2020 Project Bond Initiative proposes to provide European Investment Bank support to private sector companies issuing bonds to finance large-scale (transport, energy, ICT) infrastructure projects. In underwriting a significant component of the project financing, this proposal is a blatant attempt to transfer the private sector risk of these projects on to the already overburdened public purse.

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The bio-based economy for Europe: state of play and future potential (May 2011)

Another Commission attempt to legitimize a concept without being clear on what it is, how realistic the scientific assumptions are, and an over-reliance on the uncritical promotion of technological “fixes”.

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The permit granting procedures for energy infrastructure projects (April 2011)

Europe has had a disjointed year in terms of energy policy, with three different roadmaps and an overabundance of ambitious rhetoric, none of which add up to a coherent plan for energy and climate security, and only piecemeal policies to show for it. Given the long life of energy infrastructure, the pipelines and power stations that are built in the next ten years could be decisive in determining whether Europe’s long-term climate and energy goals are realised.

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The roadmap to a resource-efficient Europe (April 2011)

Resource efficiency plays a crucial role in sustainable energy security, and it is vital that policy-makers appreciate the importance of resource efficiency and savings as the starting point for an overall energy policy for Europe.

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The EU position at the Rio+20 UN Conference on Sustainable Development (April 2011)

The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD) will take place in Brazil on 20-22 June 2012 to mark the 20th anniversary of the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), in Rio de Janeiro, and the 10th anniversary of the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) in Johannesburg. World leaders, along with thousands of participants from governments, the private sector, NGOs and other groups, will come together at “Rio+20″ to shape how we can reduce poverty, advance social equity and ensure environmental protection on an ever more crowded planet.

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The use of biomass for energy purposes (March 2011)

Without binding rules on sustainability, member states can import ever more biomass from third countries without considering sustainability of production, social impacts or biodiversity, or being able to effectively measure GHG life-cycles. REDD, LULUCF and the CBD are all potential drivers toward sustainability, but not yet sufficient to ensure genuine sustainability.

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The external dimension of the EU energy strategy (February 2011)

QCEA welcomed this consultation as a public acknowledgement of the connections between EU foreign/external policy and energy policy. This is a connection not made often enough either in EU public statements or in the substance of the energy strategy and policy.

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The roadmap to a low-carbon economy (December 2010)

If the European Union is not careful, a coordinated response to Europe’s energy revolution will be impossible, and the consequences ungovernable. Given that the energy decisions we make today will be with us for decades to come, we just wish they had published the Roadmap for a low carbon economy by 2050 prior to (recently) agreeing the recommendations to Energy 2020.

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Competitiveness and the internal energy market (July 2006)

Suppliers of green energy should be able to compete on a level playing field. We need shared approaches to promoting energy conservation and renewables, so that cheap fossil- and subsidized nuclear-based suppliers don’t undercut more responsible suppliers.

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